Charcoal Toothpaste for Teeth Whitening: Is it right for you?

June 28, 2020

 

Charcoal Toothpaste for Teeth Whitening: Is it right for you?

 

Charcoal is currently one of the trends gaining popularity among patients who desire whiter teeth as numerous testimonials share their experiences with the product. Activated charcoal that is contained in the toothpastes are sold in stores and online.

 

Activated charcoal — the type used not just in these toothpastes but also in cosmetic beauty facial creams is a fine grain powder typically derived from various woods, coconut shells, and other natural substances. Theses substances are then oxidized under extreme heat to produce charcoal.

 

There are a number of charcoal toothpaste products sold by different manufacturers with claims that the charcoal not only cleans but can be helpful in removing toxins from the teeth. The real question is not only is there any real evidence for this but can it also whiten teeth as others have claimed?

 

Read on to learn a little more about the pros and cons of activated charcoal and decide for yourself.

 

Charcoal toothpaste for whitening: What's really happening?

Activated charcoal in toothpaste can remove some surface stains of the teeth as the charcoal is highly abrasive and may absorb surface stains to some degree. The biggest problem is that to achieve true whitening you have to penetrate further below the enamel and get to those intrinsic stains which are a large part of the whitening process.

 

Although charcoal does some to show some benefits there currently isn't enough evidence to show that it can be used alone to achieve whitening that can compare with other more readily available products on the market or professional whitening performed in the office.

 

Is it dangerous to use charcoal toothpaste?

Activated Charcoal is actually quite abrasive and when used everyday could potentially wear down the enamel on your teeth which could potentially lead to yellowing of the teeth because of the exposure of dentin. Dentin is a yellow calcified tissue which is exposed would lead to additional tooth sensitivity. 

 

Activated charcoal can actually damage your teeth if used daily. Using a material that’s too abrasive on your teeth can wear down your enamel. This may make your teeth look more yellow by exposing the dentin, a calcified yellow tissue. It can also make your teeth more sensitive.

 

Charcoal could also have some negative effects on your materials used in your bridges, crowns and fillings. It is not really understood what the long term impact could be from regular use of charcoal on these items.

 

 

The takeaway!

The hype given to charcoal products in terms of whitening are essentially just that...hype. If your truly interested in the whitening process there are a multitude of options available to the patient that will provide you with the results your looking for.

 

Speak to your dentist about which option is right for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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